Mafia presence “particularly intense” in Lombardy 

Organised crime strong in northern region.

“No territory in the [Italian] north is immune from organised crime.” This is the conclusion of the parliamentary anti-mafia commission, whose president Rosi Bindi MP (photo) presented the annual report this week, reconfirming the findings of previous years.

The year’s activity has shown how penetration by organised crime groups is “deep and uniform, involving the majority of northern provinces, with particular intensity in Lombardy,” the report stated.

“Colonisation by the ‘Ndrangheta has been confirmed in several places, with a particular emphasis on smaller comuni.”

The commission reported on how mafias can make a profit whether the economy is in expansion or in recession. “There is no sector in which mafia groups have not invested, from construction to tourism, from commerce to restaurants, from legal gambling to sport,” stated the report.

The Lombardy health services appeared to be “strongly affected” by the ‘Ndrangheta.  This mafia’s families managed to penetrate various segments of the public health system, from bidding for supplies to the management of important local health offices, the distribution of medicines and the control of pharmacies.

The main mafias or organised crime syndicates in Italy are: Cosa Nostra (Sicily, originally known as “the Mafia” before the term became used more widely), ‘Ndrangheta (Calabria), Camorra (Campania) and Sacra Corona Unita (Puglia). Although originally based in the regions quoted, the first three have in recent years expanded their activity outside their home territory, Cosa Nostra principally to the Americas, and ‘Ndrangheta and Camorra to northern Italy and beyond, especially to northern Europe.