9 Feb-30 March 2010. Over 70 photographs taken by the greatest Russian photographers of the 20th century focus on the evolution of the human portrait from the second half of the 1920s to the height of the Stalinist regime the following decade.

The photographers on show include Ida Napel'baum, Jurij Eremin, Nikolaj Sviscov-Paola, Aleksandr Grinberg, Nikolaj Vlas'evskij, Andrei Telesov, Vasilij Divago and Grigorij Zimin, who in the 1920s often portrayed naked female bodies. In the ten years that followed the Stalinist regime decided that to portray nudes was a form of capitalistic degeneration and therefore had to be banned. The body had to be portrayed solely for propaganda purposes to help build up the image of the perfect Soviet citizen, who became the model of a new socialist iconography. Consequently, the negatives of their pictures were all destroyed and the few prints that were preserved belonged to private collectors. However, some photographers continued to cultivate the nude genre against the regime

General Info

Address Fondazione Luciana Matalon. Foro Bonaparte 67, Milan, tel. 02878781, 0245470885. Tues-Sat 10.00-19.00.

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Nudes for Stalin

Fondazione Luciana Matalon. Foro Bonaparte 67, Milan, tel. 02878781, 0245470885. Tues-Sat 10.00-19.00.